Sir Terry Frost was born in 1915 at Leamington Spa in Warwickshire and did not become an artist until he was in his 30s. His artistic talent was discovered during the four years he spent as a prisoner of war in a camp in Bavaria during the Second World War, where he met another artist by the name of Adrian Heath, who taught him.  Of his experience Frost said “In prisoner of war camp I got tremendous spiritual experience, a more aware or heightened perception during starvation, and I honestly do not think that awakening has ever left me”.

Subsequently on his return to the United Kingdom, Frost studied at Camberwell School of Arts and Crafts and St. Ives School of Art. In 1951, he worked as an assistant to the sculptor Barbara Hepworth. His career included teaching at the Bath Academy of Art, serving as Gregory Fellow at the University of Leeds, and teaching at the Cyprus College of Art.  By the late 1950’s he had become established as a leading abstract painter exhibiting on a regular basis in London and throughout the world.

It was in 1974 when he moved permanently to Newlyn in Cornwall where his love of the area gave such a rich source of inspiration for much of his work.  A retrospective exhibition of his work was held at the Mayor Gallery, London in 1990, and in 2000 a major retrospective, ‘Terry Frost: Six Decades’ was held at the Royal Academy of Arts.

Terry Frost was one of the UK’s most successful and highly acclaimed artists of the 20th Century and was granted a Knighthood in 1998 in recognition for his art.