The Sluice Gates at the Old Mill, Standon, 1939

by Charles Ginner

P.O.A.

DIMENSIONS: (unframed) 11.7 x 16.7 ins
SIGNATURE: Signed C. Ginner’ lower right, A label on the verso reads ‘presented by the family Molly, Viv, Dev and John upon the 40th anniversary of our wedding day’
MEDIUM: Watercolour on paper

 

Catalogue No: 4693 Categories: ,

‘For sheer glory of colour it is difficult indeed to surpass Mr. C. Ginner.’-The critic of the Art News wrote this of the brightness of Ginner’s works on display in the first Camden Town Group exhibition.

This stunning use of colour is seen in this wonderful watercolour by Charles Ginner. Here, Ginner has used vibrant blues and greens to depict the foliage and water around the sluice gates at the Old Mill in Standon. Standon is a picturesque village in the county of Hertfordshire and the Old Mill is a tranquil spot where buzzards are often seen flying overhead. The bridge on top of the sluices gates, seen in the centre of this work, is also a place where visitors can spot kingfishers and herons. The Old Mill in Standon was owned by Edward Le Bas, a close friend of Ginner who often stayed there, particularly during the beginning of the Second World War.

Ginner was known for his use of small, regular touches of thick paint, a method that gave his works the appearance of densely worked embroidery, like here. Using watercolour paints in browns and oranges, Ginner has painted the buildings in great detail, carefully articulating each single brick through the careful application of dabs of paint. This technique has also been used to recreate the texture and abundance of the trees and vegetation. This watercolour, dating from 1939, demonstrates Ginner’s lifelong fascination with surfaces such as brick and foliage, and the technical problems depicting them.

Edward Le Bas;
The Piccadilly Gallery London;
Thos Agnew & Son, 1983;
Private Collection, United Kingdom

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Ginner was known for his use of small, regular touches of thick paint, a method that gave his works the appearance of densely worked embroidery, like here. Using watercolour paints in browns and oranges, Ginner has painted the buildings in great detail, carefully articulating each single brick through the careful application of dabs of paint. This technique has also been used to recreate the texture and abundance of the trees and vegetation. This watercolour, dating from 1939, demonstrates Ginner’s lifelong fascination with surfaces such as brick and foliage, and the technical problems depicting them.
Charles Ginner was born on 4th March 1878 in Cannes, France and key member and founder of the Camden Group. Born to British parents in France, Ginner began studying painting in 1904, first at the Academie Vitti and then at the École des Beaux Arts in Paris. Ginner was ridiculed for his enthusiasm for Van Gogh, who remained the single most important influence on his work.
In 1908 Ginner sent work to the Allied Artists’ Association in London, where he met Harold Gilman and Spencer Gore. He became a regular visitor to Sickert’s ‘Saturdays’ in Fitzroy Street, his interest in Post-Impressionism affiliating him with the Camden Town Group, of which he was a founder-member. He also joined the London Group in 1913 and the Cumberland Market Group in 1914.