Paesaggio + Volo di Rondini (Landscape and Swallows in Flight)

by Giacomo Balla

P.O.A.

DIMENSIONS: (unframed) 30.5 x 30.5 in./ 77 x 77 cm
SIGNATURE: Signed ‘Futur Balla’ (lower left); Signed ‘Balla’ and titled on the reverse
MEDIUM: Oil on canvas
DATE: Circa 1929

Painted in around 1929, this is a vivacious and colourful prefiguration of Balla’s prominent twenties abstract works, a symmetrical arrangement of interlocked shapes and plastic experimentation in line with Futurist ideology. The twenties mark the artist’s interest in rich, decorative schemes for interior decorations, furniture, and clothing as a way to integrate his artistic credo and the idea of abstract chromatic decorativism into daily life.

Catalogue No: 5183 Categories: ,

Paesaggio + Volo di Rondini examines one of the artist’s favoured themes; that of movement. The highly evocative title for this work relates to this theme: through the choice of the word ‘paesaggio’, a landscape of shapes is focused upon and is linked to the imagery of flying swallows evoked by the ‘volo di rondini’. Balla first employed the flight of swallows as a visual mechanism during his stay in Dusseldorf in 1912 when he was decorating Lowenstein House, comparing the birds to the ones he used to see in Rome, and absorbing such visual imagery into his following studies and major compositions, such as Linee andamentali + successioni dinamiche of 1913, now in the MoMA, New York. It was the close examination of natural flight and animals which led the artist to explore the concept and representation of machinery and cars in movement. This in turn made him turn to complete abstraction and purity of form in his art. The fluttering sound of swallows is conveyed in a vortex and sequential array of circular shapes which radiate through the composition whilst the white of the clouds and the blue of the sky intertwine to provide a visual and energetic representation of birds in flight. Giovanni Lista cites Fra Carnevale’s La Nascita della Vergine, of 1467, as the first noteworthy visual reference of birds in flight in the history of painting, relating it to Balla’s own explorations of the subject. Paesaggio + Volo di Rondini appeals to the senses through sight and sound, a primary Futurist aim, evoking sound through sight and synthesising form and rhythm.

Painted in around 1929, this is a vivacious and colourful prefiguration of Balla’s prominent twenties abstract works, a symmetrical arrangement of interlocked shapes and plastic experimentation in line with Futurist ideology. The twenties mark the artist’s interest in rich, decorative schemes for interior decorations, furniture, and clothing as a way to integrate his artistic credo and the idea of abstract chromatic decorativism into daily life.

Provenance

Casa Balla, Rome (no. 325)
Alessandro Campilli, Rome (by 1961);
Sale: Sotheby’s, London, 2 December 1982, lot 448;
Private Collection, United Kingdom;
Sale: Sotheby’s London 6 February 2014, Lot 368;
Private collection, United Kingdom

Buy with confidence: our assurance to you

Professional Associations

We have built up a strong reputation for the quality of the paintings, drawings and sculpture that we curate, exhibit and sell. Our professional associations with bodies such as The British Antique Dealers’ Association (BADA) and the Association of Art & Antique Dealers (LAPADA) are as a result of our reputation for integrity, our wide knowledge of fine arts and the high quality of our stock. Our business standards and expertise are reviewed regularly to adhere vigorously with enforced Codes. Our memberships and commitment to its Code of Conducts, gives our buyers confidence when purchasing a work from us.

Authenticity

Condition reports and certificates of authenticity vary in their nature by artwork, for more information on your pieces of interest, please enquire with the gallery.

Artwork images

We take pride in the attention we give to our images of the artworks for purchase and invest in these to ensure outputs are aligned as closely as possible to the item in reality. We do not apply filters or modify images, we provide high quality images to reflect the high quality of our artworks.

Your purchase process

Payment processing – You can be assured that payments are securely processed through Worldpay’s trusted payment gateway.

The Trinity House promise to you

Shipping and packaging

Shipping and packaging requirements are assessed per piece to ensure the most suitable protection for the artwork. Trinity House will therefore call following purchase to agree the recommendations and costs.

Our After Sales services

We offer the following services which we will be happy to discuss with you following your purchase, alternatively you can enquire for more information.

Insurance

We offer insurance appraisals to protect your prised artwork and help you find the right cover and policy for you.

Framing

We are able to advise on framing and have access to every type and style to suit any artistic period or room setting.

Conservation

The nature of the materials involved in a painting mean that on occasion some pieces are susceptible to movement and the effects of natural ageing. We are able to provide advice on practical measures to conserve the original condition of a piece and have relationships with restorers and framers to offer you a range of services to meet your needs.

Literature

Maurizo Calvesi, Il Futurismo: penetrazione e magia nella pittura di Balla,
Milan, 1967-68, illustrated p. 146 (titled Vele al Vento);
Giovanni Lista, Balla, Lausanne, 1984, illustrated fig. 1182

Biography

 

Giacomo Balla was born in Turin on July 18, 1871. In 1891 he studied briefly at the Accademia Albertina di Belle Arti and the Liceo Artistico in Turin and exhibited for the first time under the aegis of the Società Promotrice di Belle Arti in that city. He studied at the University of Turin with Cesare Lombroso about 1892. In 1895 Balla moved to Rome, where he worked for several years as an illustrator, caricaturist, and portrait painter. In 1899 his work was included in the Venice Biennale and in the Esposizione internazionale di belle arti at the galleries of the Società degli Amatori e Cultori di Belle Arti in Rome, where he exhibited regularly for the next ten years. In 1900 Balla spent seven months in Paris assisting the illustrator Serafino Macchiati. About 1903 he began to instruct Gino Severini and Umberto Boccioni in divisionist painting techniques. In 1903 his work was exhibited at the Esposizione internazionale d’arte della città di Venezia and in 1903 and 1904 at the Glaspalast in Munich. In 1904 Balla was represented in the Internationale Kunstausstellung in Düsseldorf, and in 1909 exhibited at the Salon d’Automne in Paris.

Balla signed the second Futurist painting manifesto of 1910 with Boccioni, Carlo Carrà, Luigi Russolo, and Severini, although he did not exhibit with the group until 1913. In 1912 he traveled to London and to Düsseldorf, where he began painting his abstract light studies. In 1913 Balla participated in the Erste deutsche Herbstsalon at Der Sturm gallery in Berlin and in an exhibition at the Rotterdamsche Kunstkring in Rotterdam. In 1914 he experimented with sculpture for the first time and showed it in the Prima esposizione libera futurista at the Galleria Sprovieri, Rome. He also designed and painted Futurist furniture and designed Futurist “antineutral” clothing. With Fortunato Depero, Balla wrote the manifesto Ricostruzione futurista dell’universo in 1915. His first solo exhibitions were held that same year at the Società Italiana Lampade Elettriche “Z” and at the Sala d’Arte A. Angelelli in Rome. His work was also shown in 1915 at the Panama-Pacific International Exposition in San Francisco. In 1918 he was given a solo show at the Casa d’Arte Bragaglia in Rome. Balla continued to exhibit in Europe and the United States and in 1935 was made a member of the Accademia di San Luca in Rome. He died on March 1, 1958, in Rome.

Be the first to hear our news about exhibitions

Sign-up for the Trinity newsletter